I Know What I Saw

Last night, live on TV, I saw heavily armed and armored military police and other law enforcement advance into a peaceful protest—peaceful, as stated by every one of the dozens of journalists witnessing.

This included mounted officers charging into a crowd that offered no resistance except to kneel or to back away.

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Ask Yourself…

…can you imagine police pinning a white man’s carotid artery for four minutes or more until he died, begging for air?

…can you imagine anyone not immediately being charged for crushing a man’s neck with a knee, no matter what job they held?Or for standing around passively and watching it happen?

…can you imagine black men killing a white man on tape and not being charged for a week?

I think you have your answers.

Now, ask yourself—how are you part of the problem?

I Should Be Married by Now

How we spent today

I should be married by now.

After all, the ceremony was set to begin at 3:30, end at 4:30. By now we would be married, have celebrated with cocktails, sat down to dinner. At this very moment we’d probably be dancing.

But we’re not. Because that’s not what the time calls for. Instead we got a strawberry-and-cream cake and drank some champagne at home.

We’ve rescheduled for October, and have plans in place for social distancing, but as long as I get married and get to wear the dress I’ll be happy.

In another timeline, another Allison is having the wedding she planned.

And in that timeline nearly 100, 000 Americans are still alive, as are hundreds of thousands more around the world.

That they are not here with us is the real tragedy of today.

At the end of our times, I pray, another wedding will take place. And the dead will rise; Arlington Cemetery, across the way, will empty; dust will rise up from the streets and form back into towers long-lost.

Then we will have dancing.

Halloween 2019: The Scariest Darn Book I Ever Did Read

Best Tales of Texas Ghosts
Docia Shultz Williams
Republic of Texas Press
1998

Night. South Texas. A La Quinta hotel room. Circa 2007.

I have never been so terrified of the ceiling. My mother and sister are sleeping in the room, but that doesn’t comfort this twelve-year-old at all. A streetlight shines through the cracks in the curtain, reflecting a pale pool of light onto the ceiling. Shadows lurk at the edges of the pool, draping down to cover the bathroom door.

And it’s all my fault.

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DC Noir, #1

Train door at the Pentagon station opens. On the platform are a man in uniform–a Marine– and a civilian woman. She hops on. He tells her it’s the wrong train. They proceed to debate through the open train door, growing more urgent as departure time approaches.

A Metro worker begins to laugh and points at the electronic signage. The woman relents and gets off.

It is quiet on the train, except for the laughter of the Metro man.

My Freelancer Site Is Live!

Hello there!

It’s a time of big changes. I’m moving, looking for a full time job, getting married–and this shake-up has made its way to my blog.

How are you liking the new theme? I think it’s much less distracting.

Don’t worry, all the great true-crime and dark content of this site will keep coming–and more, I hope, as I finally see a light at the end of the tunnel of comps.

I’ve been doing some freelancer work for the last year, and I’ve decided to set up a separate website and blog dedicated to my professional writing and editing.

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9 “Forensic Files” Episodes That Aren’t About Murder

Forensic Files proudly advertises its standing as the longest-running true-crime series on TV. Originally narrated by the magnificent Peter Thomas, the series serves up perfect twenty-minute stories of crime and justice.

But not all the episodes focus on murder, or even crimes. A good portion of the early-season episodes focused on mysteries beyond the scope of human justice.

Below are 9 episodes from Seasons 1, 2, and 3 that actually didn’t feature murder:

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